Prevalence and distribution of Arcobacter species in various sources in Turkey and molecular analysis of isolated strains by ERIC-PCR


Aydin F. , Gumussoy K. S. , Atabay H. I. , Ica T. , Abay S.

JOURNAL OF APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY, vol.103, no.1, pp.27-35, 2007 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 103 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Doi Number: 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2006.03240.x
  • Title of Journal : JOURNAL OF APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
  • Page Numbers: pp.27-35

Abstract

Aims: To determine the prevalence of Arcobacter in various food, animal and water sources in Turkey and to subtype the isolated strains using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR. Methods and Results: A total of 806 samples consisting of chicken (100) and turkey meat (100); minced beef (27); rectal swabs from cattle (173), sheep (68) and dogs (62); cloacal swabs of broilers (100) and layers (100); gall bladders of cattle (50) and drinking water samples (26) were examined. A previously described membrane filtration method was used for the isolation. Isolates were identified at species level using multiplex-PCR and discriminated by ERIC-PCR for subtyping. Ninety-eight (12·1%) of the samples examined were found positive for arcobacters. Arcobacter spp. were isolated from 68%, 4%, 6·9%, 8% and 37% of chicken and turkey meats, rectal swabs and gall bladders of cattle and minced beef, respectively. No arcobacters were obtained from the rectal swabs of sheep and dogs, cloacal swabs of broilers and layers, and water samples examined. In total, 99 Arcobacter isolates were obtained. Of these isolates, 92 were identified as Arcobacter butzleri, five were Arcobacter skirrowii and two were Arcobacter cryaerophilus. Thirteen distinct DNA profiles among A. butzleri isolates were obtained by the ERIC-PCR. Of these profiles, eight were from chicken carcass, three from cattle rectal swab and two from minced beef meat isolates. Some of the isolates originated from different sources gave the same DNA profiles. All isolates of A. skirrowii and A. cryaerophilus gave different DNA profiles. Conclusions: Poultry carcasses, minced beef meat, rectal swabs and gall bladders of cattle were found to be positive for Arcobacter spp. A. butzleri was the predominant species isolated. In addition, large heterogeneity among the Arcobacter isolates was determined. Significance and Impact of the Study: Contamination of the poultry carcasses and minced beef meat, rectal and gall bladder samples of cattle with arcobacters poses a risk for both human and animal infections. Detection of several different Arcobacter strains may suggest multiple sources for contamination and infection.
Aims: To determine the prevalence of Arcobacter in various food, animal and water sources in Turkey and to subtype the isolated strains using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR.