Circulating endothelial microparticles in children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura; preliminary results


Dursun I. , DÜŞÜNSEL R. , POYRAZOGLU H. M. , Gunduz Z. , PATIROĞLU T. , ÜLGER H. , ...Daha Fazla

RHEUMATOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, cilt.31, ss.1595-1600, 2011 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 31 Konu: 12
  • Basım Tarihi: 2011
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1007/s00296-010-1528-9
  • Dergi Adı: RHEUMATOLOGY INTERNATIONAL
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.1595-1600

Özet

The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) in children with HSP and to determine whether there was a difference between patients with nephritis and those without nephritis. Twenty patients with HSP aged between 2.5 and 15 and 10 age-and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The HSP group was divided into two groups, including patients with nephritis (n = 9) and those without nephritis (n = 11). In all groups, circulating EMPs were enumerated by flow cytometry, after staining platelet-free plasma with PE-conjugated anti-CD144. At the same time, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were incubated with the platelet-free plasma of patients with HSP and that of the control group. Then, circulating EMPs were counted in HUVEC supernatant incubated with the platelet-free plasma of patients and control groups, after staining the supernatant with PE-conjugated anti-CD146. Circulating EMPs were significantly higher in both the active and the remission period of the patient groups compared with the control subjects. In the patient group, there were no statistically significant differences in the level of circulating EMPs between patients with nephritis and those without nephritis. Both CD144 and 146+EMP in patients with HSP nephritis in the active period were substantially higher than in those remissions. CD144+EMP in the active period were substantially higher than in the remission period in patients without nephritis. We detected that circulating EMPs increased in patients with HSP in both active and remission periods. Although clinical and laboratory findings return to normal in the remission period, the increased circulating EMPs may show that the subclinical inflammatory process is continuous. We think that circulating EMPs could be used as a surrogate marker for subclinical inflammation in HSP.