Evaluation of biodiesel blending, engine performance and emissions characteristics of Jatropha curcas methyl ester: Malaysian perspective


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Mofijur M., Masjuki H. H. , Kalam M. A. , Atabani A. I.

ENERGY, cilt.55, ss.879-887, 2013 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

Özet

Currently, the main crop for biodiesel in Malaysia is palm oil. Recently, Jatropha curcas has drawn the attention of the Malaysian Government. This paper aims to study the feasibility of Jatropha as a potential biodiesel feedstock for Malaysia. Physico-chemical properties of Jatropha biodiesel and its blends with diesel followed by engine performance and emissions characteristics of B-10, B-20 and B-0 were studied. The results show that viscosities of B-10 and B-20 are closer to diesel. Moreover, only the oxidation stability of B-10 and B-20 meet the European specifications (EN 590) of 20 h. Therefore, only B-10 and B-20 have been used to evaluate engine performance and emission. Compared to B-0, the average reduction in brake power (BP) is 4.67% for B-10 and 8.86% for B-20. It was observed that brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) increases as the percentage of biodiesel increase. Compared to B-0, a reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emission of 3.84% and 10.25% and carbon monoxide (CO) emission of 16% and 25% was reported using B-10 and B-20. However, the blends give higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission of 3% and 6% using B-10 and B-20. As a conclusion, B-10 and B-20 can be used in a diesel engine without any modifications. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Currently, the main crop for biodiesel in Malaysia is palm oil. Recently, Jatropha curcas has drawn the attention of the Malaysian Government. This paper aims to study the feasibility of Jatropha as a potential biodiesel feedstock for Malaysia. Physico-chemical properties of Jatropha biodiesel and its blends with diesel followed by engine performance and emissions characteristics of B10, B20 and B0 were studied. The results show that viscosities of B10 and B20 are closer to diesel. Moreover, only the oxidation stability of B10 and B20 meet the European specifications (EN 590) of 20 h. Therefore, only B10 and B20 have been used to evaluate engine performance and emission. Compared to B0, the average reduction in brake power (BP) is 4.67% for B10 and 8.86% for B20. It was observed that brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) increases as the percentage of biodiesel increase. Compared to B0, a reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emission of 3.84% and 10.25% and carbon monoxide (CO) emission of 16% and 25% was reported using B10 and B20. However, the blends give higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission of 3% and 6% using B10 and B20. As a conclusion, B10 and B20 can be used in a diesel engine without any modifications.