Diagnosis of intracranial calcification and hemorrhage in pediatric patients: Comparison of quantitative susceptibility mapping and phase images of susceptibility-weighted imaging


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Ciraci S., Gumus K. Z., Doğanay S., Dündar M. S., Ozcora G. D. K., Görkem S. B., ...More

DIAGNOSTIC AND INTERVENTIONAL IMAGING, vol.98, pp.707-714, 2017 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 98
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.diii.2017.05.004
  • Journal Name: DIAGNOSTIC AND INTERVENTIONAL IMAGING
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.707-714
  • Keywords: Quantitative susceptibility mapping, Susceptibility-weighted imaging, Calcification, Hemorrhage, Brain, BRAIN, MRI, CT
  • Erciyes University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Purpose: To prospectively compare the diagnostic capabilities of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) with those of phase images of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in the detection and differentiation of intracranial calcification and hemorrhage in pediatric patients.
Method: Sixteen pediatric patients (9 girls, 7 boys) with a mean age of 9.4 ± 6.3 (SD) years (range, 6 days—15 years) were included. Fifty-nine calcifications and 31 hemorrhages were detected. Sensitivities and specificities of the two magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques were calculated and compared using McNemar test.
Results: QSM had a sensitivity of 84.7% and specificity of 100% for the detection of calcification. SWI phase images had a sensitivity of 49.1% and specificity of 100%. For the detection of hemorrhage, QSM had a sensitivity of 90.3% and a specificity of 98.3% whereas SWI phase images yielded a sensitivity of 64.5% and specificity of 96.6%. Overall, QSM displayed significantly better sensitivity than SWI phase images in identification of calcification and hemorrhage (P < 0.05).
Conclusion: QSM is more reliable than SWI phase images in the identification of intracranial calcification and hemorrhage in pediatric patients using MR imaging.