The isolation and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni subsp jejuni from domestic geese (Anser anser)


Aydin F. , Atabay H., Akan M.

JOURNAL OF APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY, cilt.90, ss.637-642, 2001 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 90 Konu: 4
  • Basım Tarihi: 2001
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1046/j.1365-2672.2001.01293.x
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.637-642

Özet

Aims: The objectives of this study were to determine the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in free range domestic geese, and to characterize isolated strains using phenotyping criteria and SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins.
Aims: The objectives of this study were to determine the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in free range domestic geese, and to characterize isolated strains using phenotyping criteria and SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins. Methods and Results: Forty cloacal swabs from two different flocks of domestic geese were examined. All Camp. jejuni strains isolated from geese were biotyped using the Lior biotyping scheme. Twelve Camp. jejuni isolates were also tested for their susceptibility to 17 different antibacterial agents by a disc diffusion method. Fourteen of the isolates were also subjected to SDS-PAGE. All of the geese examined were found to harbour Camp. jejuni. Six geese carried more than one species of Campylobacter. All strains examined were susceptible to various antibiotics but resistant to penicillin G and cephalothin. Eleven strains (92%) were resistant to sodium cefuroxime, and eight (67%) were resistant to cloxacillin, ampicillin and colistin sulphate. Three strains (25%) were resistant to tetracycline, and one strain was resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and kanamycin. Nine strains were subtyped as Camp. jejuni subsp. jejuni biotype II and the remaining ones as biotype I. There were 96% and 100% similarities between all the strains examined by SDS-PAGE. Conclusions: This study showed that Camp. jejuni were common in the intestinal tract of domestic geese. Significance and Impact of the Study: Geese should be considered as potential reservoirs for human and animal campylobacteriosis. The antibiotic resistance data from this study also showed that fluoroquinolone resistance, which appears to be a problem in poultry isolates in some countries, is not yet a problem in these geese.