Inheritance and Expressivity of Neoplasm Trait in Crosses between the Domestic Pea (Pisum sativum subsp. sativum) and Tall Wild Pea (Pisum sativum subsp. elatius)


Sarı H., Sari D., Eker T., Aydınoğlu B., Çancı H., İkten C., ...More

AGRONOMY-BASEL, vol.10, no.12, 2020 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 10 Issue: 12
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.3390/agronomy10121869
  • Title of Journal : AGRONOMY-BASEL

Abstract

The Neoplasm trait in pea pods is reported to be due to the lack of ultraviolet (UV) light in glasshouse conditions or in response to pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.) damage. This pod deformation arises from the growth of non-meristematic tissue on pods of domesticated peas (Pisum sativum L. subsp. sativum). Neither expressivity, nor the effect of pea weevil on neoplasm in the tall wild pea (P. sativum L. subsp. elatius (M. Bieb.) Asch. & Graebn.), have been adequately studied. We aimed to study the expression and inheritance of neoplasm in the tall wild pea and crosses between domesticated and tall wild peas grown in the glasshouse (without pea weevils) and in the field (with pea weevils) under natural infestation conditions. Neoplasm was found in all pods in tall wild peas when grown in the glasshouse, while it was not detected on pods of field-grown plants despite heavy pea weevil damage. In inter-subspecific crosses between P. sativum subsp. sativum and P. sativum subsp. elatius, all F-1 plants had neoplastic pods, and the F-2 populations segregated in a good fit ratio of 3 (neoplasm): 1 (free from neoplasm) under glasshouse conditions, which suggests that neoplasm on pods of the tall wild pea was controlled by a single dominant gene. Expressivity of neoplasm in the progeny differed from parent to parent used in inter-subspecific crosses. There was no relationship between neoplasm and damage by pea weevil under heavy insect epidemics under field conditions. The neoplasm occurring under glasshouse conditions may be due to one or to a combination of environmental factors. Since wild peas are useful genetic resources for breeding programs aiming at fresh pea production that could be utilized under glasshouse conditions, negative selection could be considered in segregating populations.