Hematologically important mutations: The autosomal recessive forms of chronic granulomatous disease (second update)


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Roos D., Kuhns D. B. , Maddalena A., Bustamante J., Kannengiesser C., De Boer M., ...Daha Fazla

BLOOD CELLS MOLECULES AND DISEASES, cilt.44, ss.291-299, 2010 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Cilt numarası: 44
  • Basım Tarihi: 2010
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1016/j.bcmd.2010.01.009
  • Dergi Adı: BLOOD CELLS MOLECULES AND DISEASES
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.291-299

Özet

Chronic granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an immunodeficiency disorder affecting about 1 in 250,000 individuals. The disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding the components of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase. This enzyme produces superoxide, which is essential in the process of intracellular pathogen killing by phagocytic leukocytes. Four of the five genes involved in CGD are autosomal; these are CYBA, encoding p22-phox, NCF2, encoding p67-phox, NCF1, encoding p47-phox, and NCF4, encoding p40-phox. This article lists all mutations identified in these genes in the autosomal forms of CGD. Moreover, polymorphisms in these genes are also given, which should facilitate the recognition of future disease-causing mutations. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

 Chronic granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an immunodeficiency disorder affecting about 1 in 250,000 individuals. The disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding the components of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase. This enzyme produces superoxide, which is essential in the process of intracellular pathogen killing by phagocytic leukocytes. Four of the five genes involved in CGD are autosomal; these are CYBA, encoding p22-phox, NCF2, encoding p67-phox, NCF1, encoding p47-phox, and NCF4, encoding p40-phox. This article lists all mutations identified in these genes in the autosomal forms of CGD. Moreover, polymorphisms in these genes are also given, which should facilitate the recognition of future disease-causing mutations. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.