The effect of self-evaluation of foetal movement and position tracking on prenatal attachment and distress


Badem A., Mucuk S.

JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE AND INFANT PSYCHOLOGY, vol.42, no.3, pp.439-448, 2024 (SSCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 42 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2024
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/02646838.2022.2117290
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE AND INFANT PSYCHOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, IBZ Online, PASCAL, CINAHL, Educational research abstracts (ERA), EMBASE, MEDLINE, Psycinfo
  • Page Numbers: pp.439-448
  • Keywords: Distress, foetal movement, foetal position, pregnancy, prenatal attachment, PREGNANCY
  • Erciyes University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Objectives To determine the effect of self-evaluation of foetal movement and position tracking on prenatal attachment and distress. Methods The study was a randomised controlled study . The study included women who came to the Kahramanmaras Maternity and Children's Hospital for prenatal examination. The data were collected using a questionnaire form, the prenatal attachment inventory (PAI), and the Tilburg pregnancy distress scale (TPDS). The pregnant women in the intervention group were trained to count the foetal movements and track the position of the foetus. Data were evaluated using paired samples t-test, independent samples t-test, chi-square test, Pearson correlation analysis, and linear regression analysis. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under the process NCT05313113. Results Although the mean PAI pre-test scores were similar in the intervention and control groups (t = -0.811; p = 0.420), a significant difference was observed in the mean post-test scores between the two groups (t = 6.404; p < 0.001). The mean TPDS pre-test scores were similar in both groups (t = 0.933; p = 0.453), but a significant difference was observed in the mean post-test scores (t = -3.345; p < 0.001). Conclusion Thus, self-evaluation of foetal movement and foetal position tracking increased the prenatal attachment.