Using fluid whey in comminuted meat products: Effects on textural properties of frankfurter-type sausages


Yetim H. , Müller W., Dogan M. , Klettner .

JOURNAL OF MUSCLE FOODS, cilt.17, ss.354-366, 2006 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 17 Konu: 3
  • Basım Tarihi: 2006
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1111/j.1745-4573.2006.00055.x
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF MUSCLE FOODS
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.354-366

Özet

The objective of this research was to determine the possibility of using fluid whey in frankfurter formulations and to observe its effects on the textural properties of frankfurter-type sausages. For this purpose, fluid whey substituted for ice used in sausages was manufactured and their textural characteristics were measured. Results of this research showed that liquid whey could be substituted for up to 100% of the ice in frankfurter formulations. For example, similar or more desirable emulsion stability and textural and color properties were obtained in comparison with the control group that contained no whey. For example, % jelly deposit and fat separation were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in 25% whey-replaced groups. Again, a higher chewiness and elasticity but lower brittleness and hardness values were measured in no whey-containing control groups compared with the 50, 75 and 100% fluid whey-substituted sausages, and the highest redness (a*) value was with the 75 and 100% whey-replaced samples. Therefore, utilization of liquid whey in comminuted meat products offers an enormous economic advantage and potential to fortify and improve functionality of processed meat products. In this way, the drying or condensing expenses as well as environmental concerns for disposing over surplus whey could also be eliminated.
The objective of this research was to determine the possibility of using fluid whey in frankfurter formulations and to observe its effects on the textural properties of frankfurter-type sausages. For this purpose, fluid whey substituted for ice used in sausages was manufactured and their textural characteristics were measured. Results of this research showed that liquid whey could be substituted for up to 100% of the ice in frankfurter formulations. For example, similar or more desirable emulsion stability and textural and color properties were obtained in comparison with the control group that contained no whey. For example, % jelly deposit and fat separation were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in 25% whey-replaced groups. Again, a higher chewiness and elasticity but lower brittleness and hardness values were measured in no whey-containing control groups compared with the 50, 75 and 100% fluid whey-substituted sausages, and the highest redness (a*) value was with the 75 and 100% whey-replaced samples. Therefore, utilization of liquid whey in comminuted meat products offers an enormous economic advantage and potential to fortify and improve functionality of processed meat products. In this way, the drying or condensing expenses as well as environmental concerns for disposing over surplus whey could also be eliminated.