Effects of dietary chromium and ascorbic acid supplementation on digestion of nutrients, serum antioxidant status, and mineral concentrations in laying hens reared at a low ambient temperature


Sahin K., Sahin N., KÜÇÜK O.

BIOLOGICAL TRACE ELEMENT RESEARCH, vol.87, pp.113-124, 2002 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 87
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Doi Number: 10.1385/bter:87:1-3:113
  • Title of Journal : BIOLOGICAL TRACE ELEMENT RESEARCH
  • Page Numbers: pp.113-124
  • Keywords: cold stress, chromium, vitamin C, MDA, minerals, laying hen, PICOLINATE SUPPLEMENTATION, LIPID-PEROXIDATION, CARCASS TRAITS, BROILER CHICKS, STRESS, PERFORMANCE, HEAT, CORTICOSTERONE, METABOLISM, WITHDRAWAL

Abstract

This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of chromium (chromium picolinate, CrPic) and vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) supplementation on the digestion of nutrients and serum concentration of some antioxidant vitamins and minerals of laying hens (Hy-Line) reared at a low ambient temperature (6.8degreesC). One hundred twenty laying hens (32 wk old) were divided into 4 groups, 30 hens per group. The laying hens were fed either a basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with either 400 mug of Cr/kg diet, 250 Mg of L-ascorbic acid/kg diet, or 400 mug of Cr plus 250 mg L-ascorbic acid/kg diet. The digestibility of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, and EE) increased by the supplementation of chromium and vitamin C (p < 0.05). Supplemental chromium and vitamin C also increased serum vitamin C and E but decreased malondialdehyde concentrations (p < 0.05). Additionally, supplemental chromium and vitamin C caused an increase in the serum concentrations of Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cr (p < 0.05) but a decrease in Cu concentration. The results of the present study showed that each dietary supplement influenced most of the parameters measured in a similar way. Also, a combination of the two supplements resulted in an additive effect, and supplementing a combination of vitamin C (250 mg/kg of diet) and chromium (400 mu g Cr/kg diet) may offer a potential protective management practice in preventing cold-stress-related depression in the performance of laying hens.