Supplemental zinc and vitamin A can alleviate negative effects of heat stress in broiler chickens


KÜÇÜK O. , Sahin N., Sahin K.

BIOLOGICAL TRACE ELEMENT RESEARCH, vol.94, no.3, pp.225-235, 2003 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 94 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Doi Number: 10.1385/bter:94:3:225
  • Title of Journal : BIOLOGICAL TRACE ELEMENT RESEARCH
  • Page Numbers: pp.225-235
  • Keywords: broiler chickens, heat stress, zinc, vitamin A, MDA, LIPID-PEROXIDATION, AMBIENT-TEMPERATURE, ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES, MINERAL CONCENTRATIONS, OXIDATIVE DAMAGE, ADRENAL-RESPONSE, EGG-PRODUCTION, LAYING HENS, PERFORMANCE, 32-DEGREES-C

Abstract

This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of zinc (ZnSO4.H2O) and vitamin A (retinol) supplementation on performance, carcass characteristics, and serum concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, total protein, and malondialdehyde (MDA) as an indicator of lipid peroxidation in broiler chickens (Ross) reared at a high temperature (34 degreesC). One hundred twenty 10-d-old male broilers were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups, 3 replicates of 10 birds each. The birds were fed either a basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with either 30 mg Zn/kg diet, 4.5 mg (15,000 IU) retinol/kg diet, or 30 mg Zn + 4.5 mg retinol/kg diet. Supplemental zinc and vitamin A significantly increased live weight gain and improved feed efficiency (p < 0.05). However, a combination of zinc and vitamin A, rather than each separately, provided a greater performance. Hot and chilled carcass weights and yields and the weights of internal organs with the exception of abdominal fat were greater for each supplement (p < 0.05) compared to the control group. Abdominal fat decreased (p < 0.05) upon dietary zinc and vitamin A supplementation. Supplemental treatments resulted in an increased total serum protein but decreased glucose, cholesterol, and MDA concentrations. The results of the study show that, separately or as a combination, zinc and vitamin A supplementation resulted in an improved live weight gain, feed efficiency, and carcass traits, as well as a decrease in serum MDA concentrations. The results of the present study also suggest that zinc and vitamin A have similar effects and that a combination of zinc and vitamin A may offer a potential protective management practice in preventing heat-stress-related depression in performance of broiler chickens.