Denoising of arterial and venous Doppler signals using discrete wavelet transform: Effect on clinical parameters


TOKMAKÇI M., Erdoğan N.

CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS, vol.30, no.3, pp.192-200, 2009 (SCI-Expanded) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 30 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.cct.2009.01.005
  • Journal Name: CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.192-200
  • Erciyes University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

In this paper, the effects of a wavelet transform based denoising strategy on clinical Doppler parameters are analyzed. The study scheme included: (a) Acquisition of arterial and venous Doppler signals by sampling the audio output of an ultrasound scanner from 20 healthy volunteers, (b) Noise reduction via decomposition of the signals through discrete wavelet transform, (c) Spectral analysis of noisy and noise-free signals with short time Fourier transform, (d) Curve fitting to spectrograms, (e) Calculation of clinical Doppler parameters, (f) Statistical comparison of parameters obtained from noisy and noise-free signals. The decomposition level was selected as the highest level at which the maximum power spectral density and its corresponding frequency were preserved. In all subjects. noise-free spectrograms had smoother trace with less ripples. In both arterial and venous spectrograms, denoising resulted in a significant decrease in the maximum (systolic) and mean frequency, with no statistical difference in the minimum (diastolic) frequency. In arterial signals, this leads to a significant decrease in the calculated parameters such as Systolic/Diastolic Velocity Ratio, Resistivity Index. Pulsatility Index and Acceleration Time. Acceleration Index did not change significantly. Despite a successful denoising, the effects of wavelet decomposition on high frequency components in the Doppler signal should be challenged by comparison with reference data, or, through clinical investigations. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.