Presence of Clostridioides difficile in cattle feces, carcasses, and slaughterhouses: Molecular characterization and antibacterial susceptibility of the recovered isolates


ABAY S., Ahmed E. F., AYDIN F., KARAKAYA E., MÜŞTAK H. K.

ANAEROBE, vol.75, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 75
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.anaerobe.2022.102575
  • Journal Name: ANAEROBE
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Veterinary Science Database
  • Keywords: Clostridioides difficile, Cattle feces, Cattle carcasses, tcdA, tcdB, ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE, ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY, MEAT-PRODUCTS, PCR RIBOTYPES, FARM-ANIMALS, TOXIN GENES, FOOD, PREVALENCE, INFECTION, CALVES
  • Erciyes University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

The aims of this study were to isolate and identify Clostridioides difficile from cattle feces and carcasses, and slaughterhouse samples, and to determine the molecular characteristics and antibacterial susceptibility of the recovered isolates. A total of 220 samples, including 100 cattle fecal samples, 100 cattle carcass surface samples, and 20 slaughterhouse samples were used as the study material. In total, 12 (5.45%) samples, including 11 (11%) cattle fecal samples and 1 (5%) slaughterhouse sample, were found to be positive for C. difficile. On the other hand, all of the carcass samples were negative for C. difficile. A total of 11 (91.66%) isolates, including 10 fecal isolates and 1 slaughterhouse wastewater isolate, were found to be positive for the presence of the toxin genes tcdA and tcdB, whilst 1 fecal isolate was found to be negative for both genes. In addition, 3 different ERIC-PCR profiles were identified in the 11 fecal isolates. The ERIC-PCR profile of the slaughterhouse wastewater isolate was found to be similar to one of the ERICPCR profiles obtained from the fecal isolates. All of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. Considering that the agent is a spore-forming bacterium shed in feces, the detection of C. difficile isolates of different genotypes, some carrying toxin genes, suggests that feces and slaughterhouse wastewater carrying this bacterium may pose a risk for the contamination of carcasses. The current study revealed that hygiene conditions should be performed to the maximum extent in slaughterhouses. (c) 2022 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.